Where Babies Come From #3

The Bloodbringer is actually one of my older short stories, one I posted a couple of years ago on this blog. I received positive feedback on it and, with some tweaking, it was ready for the anthology.

With this story, I wanted to capture the fear of a recovering post-apocalyptic world full of new and terrifying entities and what better lens to shoot the world through than the eyes of a child? I focused on the desolation left behind by the Event and how people adapted to it. References to TV shows and series gave way to dog-eared novels. Having the story take place in the dead of night added to the sinister mood. I know I’m not the only one who was scared of shadows in the night as a child.

Gangsters are rather a large problem here in Cape Town, to put it very mildly. That made putting organised criminals in the limelight as my villains very easy. The fear factor didn’t come from them. I modeled the ghoul in the story on deep fears of mine: lurking murderers, impossibly strong monsters and silent shades. I never explained what the ghoul was and I don’t plan to. Fear of the unknown is another deep fear of mine.

The Bloodbringer was the first story that involved large chunks of descriptive text and represents an important marker for me. It was my first shot an atmospheric piece and I think I did a decent job.

Thanks for reading and enjoy your day.

Where Babies Come From #2

As usual, spoilers ahead. Get a copy of Blackout or give me a shout if you want a free copy.
We’re going into the more meaty stories now, with Panic being first. I wanted to go to a foreign location for the epicenter of the apocalypse. Doing one of the cosmopolitan European cities would have been a cheap way out and there are enough end-of-the-world stories set in the US, so I didn’t need to add any more. I thought Nigeria, being Africa’s largest economy at this point, would be interesting place in which to set my story.

Most of my stories, novel including, happen long after the Event hits, so I felt obliged to write one at the point of impact. The whole thing is described as horrific, world-ending but very distant in the main narrative, turning Panic into something more visceral and more real. It gave my descriptive skills a bit of challenge in keeping the reader’s attention with a single character, no dialogue and an entire city going to hell. No one in the subsequent stories quite knows what happened, so giving the reader something extra seemed good.

The apocalypse introducing the power of telekinesis was always on the cards, with the end of Panic showcasing my unique take on magic system in science-fiction settings. With telekinesis being a magnetism-like force, I have a somewhat scientific sounding system that’s quite fun to play with. I really enjoy the sense of scale, destruction and power that telekinesis brings to a story, so I wanted to have that as a resource in my novel and in Panic, you get to see where that comes from. Mutagens introducing superpowers are something I’ve seen in some of my favourite pieces of fiction and I took it upon myself to deal with the concept very differently.

Thanks for reading and have a nice day.

Where Babies Come From #1

I like to share things with the world. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t have attempted writing books and publishing them. I really do enjoy pouring my emotions onto the page/keyboard and hopefully eliciting the same sort of feelings in my readers. What does spawning literary ideas and writing fiction have to do with babies? Creative juices, my friend!

Anyway, I thought I’d start sharing the inspirations for the various things I write. I released Blackout last month, so I’ve got license to harp on about it for a little bit longer. I’m going to start with the two shortest pieces in Blackout, to ease myself into this. Fair warning, there may be spoilers ahead.

The Event
The Event is as general as general gets. It sets up the world in the mind of the reader, making a general picture before the other short stories make up wrinkles in the tapestry. The post-apocalyptic setting is one that I rather enjoy when it’s done well and done with some sort of variation. The generic ‘cataclysm that turns humanity into scavengers and vagrants’ has been done to death, so I thought I’d do something different and jump forward fifty years to see some semblance of bouncing back. Having learned about market economies in EMS in Grade 9, I found the concept interesting and decided to implement a form of it in my series.

I think PMCs are a pretty cool concept narratively. Having the protagonist tied to actual professional killers masquerading as a national military, itself mocked as a bunch of paid murderers, makes for some fun moral exploration, especially when applied to an entire society invested in the idea of war being necessary for their daily bread.

Titans of Another Time
I’m a huge nerd about certain science fiction concepts. Humanoid war machines are one such concept. Having watched such things as Gundam, Gurren Lagann, Code Geass and more recently mainstream blockbusters that feature mecha, I find the things pretty cool and decided to put my own spin on things. Because copyrights and trademarks are things that exist, I ended up having to make my own name for my humanoid tanks. I’m not the best with names but Lordframe sounded cool, so I stuck with that.

I really enjoy drawing mecha as well, so I’ve a wide variety of things to describe and fiddle with. Maybe I’ll upload those some day when I feel more confident about them. There’s a sense of grandeur and scale with humanoid war machines that I think is awesome and I couldn’t really do anything but include them in my stories.

Thank you for reading and have a nice day.

Frame of Mind

Recently I finished writing My Angels, which is easily the darkest piece of fiction I’ve ever done. And I admit, I was not in a good place when I wrote it. It contains scenes of torture, child abuse and forced drug addiction. But now I’m just shilling Blackout and not writing anything informative.

1. Mood is important. Try to be happy when writing happy scenes or it’ll show in your writing. Try not to be angry while you write, or it’ll show in your writing. Try to be positive about the piece of fiction you’re trying to put forward or it’ll reduce the quality of a piece of fiction. The exception is dialogue. Feel free to be angry, or channel anger, when writing angry dialogue. This can actually sell the whole thing.

2. Don’t be scared to put something out there. Even if it’s not the best thing in the world, it’s still yours, it’s still recognisably yours. You should own every piece of fiction you put out and you should get into that sort of frame of mind when you write and advertise. Fear and self-doubt are killers that you shouldn’t succumb to. This frame of mind is similar to that in positive writing. Believe in yourself and what you’ve done and you’ll be alright, I swear.

3. Be You. I cannot overstate this. Everyone who comes to read your work is there to read your work. Not Tolkien’s, not Martin’s, not Applegate’s, yours. Be in the state of mind to make things your own. Don’t be a second-rate someone if you can be a first-rate you!

Thanks for reading and enjoy your day! Happy holidays and a Merry Christmas to you all!