Where Babies Come From #5

As usual, spoilers ahead. 

I really enjoyed writing Outed. It gave me a chance to do a quieter local story with more ‘regular’ people being the focus. Eventually I was going to have to give in to the stereotype about South African fiction and tackle discrimination so this is the story where that happens. I’m not mature enough to sensitively tackle racism and segregation, so I didn’t focus on that sort of prejudice. Instead, I wrote an allegory on coming out, hence the title. I’ve never had that sort of experience, so this particular story took a fair amount of research to pull off.

The X-Men series of comics have taken the route of comparing having to grapple with superpowers to having to come out for years. I didn’t quite do the same thing, but the more well-written comics are certainly a point of inspiration for me. Between offhand comments from other people to outright spouting of hatred, I aimed to capture the universal sort of distrust and disdain closeted people fear. I, of course, do not claim to have captured or have fully understood the feeling. I can only guess at what that feels like and I have absolutely no intention of speaking above those voices.

This story is the first in the anthology with a female protagonist. I’d experimented with writing from a woman’s perspective a couple of times before this and I found, to absolutely no one’s shock, that it’s practically identical to writing from a man’s perspective. Funny that…

The protagonist, Maddie, is the first person I really show experimenting with their telekinetic abilities and this has important ramifications on the rest of the series. Between using small sparks to light candles and bigger crackles to intimidate hecklers, Maddie trivialises telekinesis which, at this point, humanity has very little understanding about. By the climax, her abilities are well-established, making the feat of containing a house blaze much more ‘believable’. This is, of course, nothing special compared to stunts pulled off by later characters, but more on that when I get to Angel Apocalypse.

With the addition of brain-hemorrhages and nerve damage, there are faux-biological side-effects for overuse of telekinetic abilities, referred to as burning out in my internal planning. I wanted this story to follow the tone, or hardness, of science-fiction the other stories have while teasing the reader with a bit of grand telekinetic action.

Thanks for reading and enjoy your day.

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